In the Bunker

In the Bunker

Díaz in one of Colombia Battalion’s fortified positions while on the front line. The men of the Colombia Battalion were about fifteen to twenty days on the front line, depending on the situation or intensity of the fight. Then, they were taken to the reserve, where they stayed for two weeks carrying out retraining activities, and later sent back to the front.

In the Bunker

In the Bunker

The armies of the United Nations coalition were better supplied than their adversaries. Díaz notes that the food was good and that allied logistics services were responsible for providing rations with a good proportion of meat and fresh produce. A hot meal was always rewarding after the hard days on the front lines.

In the Bunker

In the Bunker

Díaz with one of his fellows. When patrols were not made, the men of the Colombia Battalion had free time to do other activities.

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

Díaz among friends. During the war, it is inevitable to forge bonds of friendship between fellows and brothers in arms. This friendliness is essential to maintain group cohesion and avoid the adversities of war, especially in times of crisis.

Sergeant Thorwald Bodensiek

Sergeant Thorwald Bodensiek

Sergeant Thorwald Bodensiek on reserve. Bodensiek was a Colombian of German descent who represented the country in the Korean War.

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

Díaz with Sergeant Thorwald Bodensiek, with whom he was friends for many years. For Díaz, camaraderie and trust in his brothers in arms was fundamental. At the time of entering combat, he always felt supported by the men under his command.

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

Díaz at the command post of the Colombia Battalion, together with Corporal Rafael Herrera, one of his best friends during his stay in the Korean War.

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

Díaz at the command post of the Colombia Battalion, together with Corporal Rafael Herrera, one of his best friends during his stay in the Korean War.

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

In the photograph, Sergeant Nicolás Garzón stands out in the middle of the group. He was one of Díaz’s fellows and disappeared during the Battle of Old Baldy (March 22-23, 1953).

In the Bunker

In the Bunker

Díaz grooming himself on the front line. Besides food, the campaign ration included personal hygiene items, soap and shaving cream, as well as cigarettes and chocolates.

Letter written during the war

Letter written during the war

Díaz writes a letter to his family while he is on the line. Even at the front, the men of the Colombia Battalion were allowed to send correspondence. This was one of the best incentives for the troops in Korea. Letters were sent by postal service, and it took about a month for families to receive them in Colombia, and another month for them to return the responses to Korea.

Brotherhood in C Company

Brotherhood in C Company

Díaz with his friend Pedro Martinez in the fortified positions of the Colombia Battalion.

Brotherhood in C Company

Brotherhood in C Company

Díaz accompanied by an American soldier (center) and one of the interpreters (left). The men of the Colombia Battalion had the opportunity of meeting members of other armies from around the world. Although the language barrier could be an impediment to communication, interpreters were available to overcome these difficulties.

Brotherhood in C Company

Brotherhood in C Company

One of the most important reason to overcome the many difficulties during the war was the power of brotherhood in C Company.

To observe the enemy

To observe the enemy

Díaz’s fellows in the Kumwha Valley. The lines of communication that connected the defensive positions with the command post of the Colombia Battalion can be observed in the upper left corner

To observe the enemy

To observe the enemy

Mortar team of the Colombia Battalion’s Heavy Weapons Company, made up of four members: a private first class and three privates, who were in charge of operating the 81mm mortar. Díaz remembers that the units were not allowed to display any insignia or rank when they were on the front line.

  • Heading for Korea

  • At the Boot Camp

  • Straight to the Line

  • In Front

  • Back to Colombia

  • Colombia Veterans' present